© Brae Talon

Foto-Interview: Skinny Girl Diet

Skinny Girl Diets Debüt-EP ist eine Kampfansage: gegen Fremdbestimmung, gelernte Vorstellungen und vorgelebte Konventionen. Reclaim you life, hinter diesen Titel möchten wir mindestens drei Ausrufezeichen setzen. Und von genauso viel Nachdruck zeugt die Musik, die das Trio, das von Dazed & Confused bereits zu London’s most badass girl gang unserer Tage gekürt wurde, hervorbringt. Vorgestellt wurden sie dort übrigens erstmals von keiner anderen als Slits-Legende Viv Albertine.

Während des Pop-Kultur Festivals in Berlin durften wir Ursula (Drums & Vocals), Delilah (Guitar & Vocals) und Amelia (Bass & Vocals) beim Soundcheck zum Foto-Interview treffen. Hier kommen unsere Fragen und die Antworten der Band – festgehalten von Fotografin Brae Talon:

1. What do you reclaim in life?
© Brae Talon
© Brae Talon

Ursula: We reclaim what it means to be female. We reclaim the gender equality and change it what suits us and there’s no boundries to that.
Delilah: And of course selflove, definitely. Forgiveness.
Amelia: We reclaim ourselves and by that I mean our own bodies, our own minds, our own lives.

Who do you address with your songs in particular?

Delilah: We don’t address anyone. We write directly from our lives and what we’re going through that might touch people who can relate, people who don’t fit in, people who feel oppressed, people who feel that their voice isn’t getting heard.
Ursula: Yeah, mostly misfits.

What’s your message for society?

Delilah: Mainly it’s rejecting beauty ideals. That’s our whole concept especially with our band name. We wanna make clear that we don’t believe the bullshit ads, media or society is telling us how to be or not to be.
Ursula: That we’re not getting sucked in by this and that we want gender equality and that we want to be free from oppression.

2. How can music change that?
© Brae Talon
© Brae Talon

Delilah: Music is one of the biggest influence on people. It always had the power to start movements. Music can change a lot. Everybody listens to music on a daily basis and what they’re listening to can influence what they think.
Ursula: On a deeper level music is very emotive and it’s a creative platform that speaks like an essay on important issues but in easy digestive way. You can make topics like feminism or gender equality more accessible for people who might not show attention to it otherwise.
Amelia: It’s a great platform to send a message but be yourself and create something authentic. It’s also a way for your voice is getting heard and maybe people don’t realize the message at first but you can seed a plant that might grow.

3. What makes you proud as a band?
© Brae Talon
© Brae Talon

Delilah: Oh, there was that girl at our gig and she told us that she found us while she was searching on the internet for a diet where she can loose weight. She listened to our music and thought “yeah, what a powerful band! To hell with loosing weight!” and that makes me incredibly proud.
Amelia: I’m proud that we managed to produce an album completely funded by us. We didn’t have any help by big record labels or sponsors. We did it just with our full hearts and power.
Ursula: I’m proud of our mixed audience! There are men, women, everything in between. There is not just one type of person and there is this wonderful energy on our shows with open hearted and open minded people. I love that!
Delilah: And when the right people don’t like us!
Amelia: Yeah, then you know, you did something right!

♫ One song, one photo: Teenage Wolf Pack ♫
© Brae Talon
© Brae Talon

 

© Brae Talon
© Brae Talon
© Brae Talon
© Brae Talon
© Brae Talon
© Brae Talon

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